The deadliest accident in the history of film-making

Director Varick Frissel, cinematographer Alex G. Penrod, and 25 other members of a film-crew were killed during the filming of the movie The Viking (1931). Dynamite that was used to remove large quantities of ice from the filming-locations was accidentally ignited and blew up the ship they were filming additional footage from off the coast of Newfoundland. With 27 total fatalities, it is the deadliest accident in the history of film-making.

Submission by Logan Agle. Thank you.

Tree worker accidentally snipped his own safety line with his chainsaw

A 40-year-old tree worker was hanging from a tree branch attached to a rope, cutting branches with a chainsaw, when he accidentally cut the rope and fell down. He died a day later in hospital.

Submission by Rik van Doorne.

Snake killed two boys during sleepover

Noah and Connor Barthe, ages 5 and 7 of New Brunswick, Canada, were killed by an African rock python. The snake had escaped its enclosure in a pet shop on the ground floor, and apparently made its way into their apartment through the ventilation system.

Killing Oneself with a Bible

Franco Brun, a 22-year-old prisoner at Toronto East Detention Centre, in Toronto, Ontario, choked to death after attempting to swallow a Gideon’s Bible.

Woman in Wedding Dress Drowned in a River

Maria Pantazopoulos, 30, drowned after being swept away in the Ouareau River just north of Montreal, Canada while wearing her wedding dress for a photography session. Ordinarily, standing near the shore in 15–30 cm (6–12 in) of water for a healthy adult would not be inherently dangerous. However, her water-soaked dress became too heavy, and she was pulled deeper into the river and succumbed to drowning. She had been married only two weeks earlier.

Leaping Lawyer

Garry Hoy, a 38-year-old lawyer in Toronto, Ontario, fell to his death on July 9, 1993, after he threw himself against a window on the 24th floor of the Toronto-Dominion Centre in an attempt to prove to a group of visitors that the glass was “unbreakable.” The glass did not break, but popped out of the window frame. For his unusual death, Hoy was recognized with a Darwin Award in 1996.

Died from Nine-Hour Sweating Session

Image credit: Radio-Canada

Chantal Lavigne, a 35-year-old mother of two, from St. Albert de Warwick, Canada, “was cooked to death” after she and eight others in a personal-development seminar called Dying in Consciousness were covered with mud, wrapped in plastic, put under blankets and immobilized with their heads in cardboard boxes for about nine hours, under instructions to hyperventilate.